Sun Remote System Control (RSC) 2.2 User’s Guide (sunfire 880 sunfire 890 )

por | 27 marzo, 2014

El escape por default de la consola es «ctrl + ~.»

Octal para SecureCRT  » \033~. «

Para mostrar el escape_char:

rsc> show escape_char
escape_char: ~

Console escape character sequence is used to return to the RSC prompt.
The default escape sequence is «~.» (tilde period). See escape_char.

 

Sun Remote System Control (RSC) 2.2 User’s Guide

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C H A P T E R  4

Using the RSC Command Shell

The RSC command shell is a simple command-line interface that supports commands that allow you to administer or diagnose the server. It also has commands for configuring RSC.

RSC supports a total of four concurrent telnet sessions per server, including command-line interface sessions and a graphical user interface (GUI) connection to the server console (Open Console). In addition, RSC supports up to four active concurrent RSC GUI sessions.

 


Note – Sun Enterprise 250 servers support two concurrent telnet sessions and three active concurrent RSC GUI sessions.

After you log in to your RSC account, the RSC shell prompt appears (rsc>), and you can enter RSC shell commands. This chapter tells you how to log in to your RSC account and describes RSC command use and syntax.

The following table summarizes RSC shell commands. Each command is explained in greater detail in the following sections.

 

TABLE 4-1 RSC Shell Commands
Name Description
environment Displays current environmental information
showenvironment Same as environment
shownetwork
Displays the current network configuration
console Connects you to the server console
break Puts the server in debug mode
xir
Generates an externally initiated soft reset to the server
bootmode Controls server firmware behavior, if followed by a server reset within 10 minutes (similar to L1-key combinations on non-USB Sun keyboards)
reset Resets the server immediately
poweroff Powers off the server
poweron Powers on the server
loghistory Displays the history of all events logged in the RSC event buffer
consolehistory Displays the history of all console messages logged in the buffer
consolerestart
Makes the current boot and run console logs «original»
set Sets a configuration variable
show Displays one or more configuration variables
date Displays or sets the current time and date
showdate Same as date command without arguments
setdate Same as date command with arguments
password Changes your RSC password
useradd
Adds an RSC user account
userdel
Deletes an RSC user account
usershow
Shows characteristics of an RSC user account
userpassword
Sets or changes a user’s password
userperm
Sets the authorization for a user
resetrsc Resets RSC immediately
help Displays a list of RSC shell commands and a brief description of each
version
Displays version number for RSC firmware and components
showsc
Same as version without the -v option
flashftp
Updates the RSC Flash ROM image
display-fru
Displays information stored in the RSC serial EEPROM
logout Ends your current RSC shell session
setlocator Turn the system locator LED on or off (Sun Fire V480 servers only).
showlocator Show the state of the system locator LED (Sun Fire V480 servers only).

Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the following shell command aliases are not available: showenvironment, showdate, setdate, and showsc.

More detailed descriptions of the commands are provided in the following sections.

 


Note – Some commands require a specific user permission level. See userperm username [a][u][c][r] for information about user permission levels.

 


Logging In to Your RSC Account

After RSC software is installed and configured and an account has been set up for you, you can connect to RSC and log in to your account using a Solaris workstation, Microsoft Windows PC, standard ASCII character terminal, or a computer running ASCII terminal emulation software.

Follow these steps to log in to your RSC account:

1. Connect to RSC using one of these methods:

a. Use point-to-point protocol (PPP) to connect to your company Ethernet, and then use the telnet command to connect to RSC.

Ask your network administrator if you do not know the server’s RSC name (Sun recommends the name servernamersc). Note that, unlike the graphical user interface, the command-line interface does not attempt to connect to RSC by appending -rsc to the name you enter if that name fails.

b. If you are already connected to your company Ethernet, use the telnet command to connect to RSC.

c. Use PPP to connect to the RSC modem. To use this option, PPP must be enabled.

d. If PPP is not enabled, dial in to the RSC modem.

When connection is established, the following screen appears:

RSC software version 2.0.0 (server-name)
Please login:
Please enter password:

e. If your server has an RSC serial port, connect an ASCII terminal directly to the RSC serial port.

 


Note – To use this method on Sun Enterprise 250 servers, you must disable PPP by using the RSC shell, RSC GUI, or the rscadmutility to set the ppp_enabledconfiguration variable to false.

2. When connection is established, type your RSC login name.

3. Type your RSC password.

Your password is not echoed on the screen. After you correctly enter your password, RSC displays this command prompt:

rsc>

You can enter RSC shell commands at the rsc> prompt.

Logins are recorded in the RSC event log. In addition, RSC sends an alert if it detects more than five login failures within five minutes. Except for Sun Enterprise 250 servers, RSC automatically disconnects a session after 10 minutes of user inactivity.

 


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, you can set RSC to disconnect a session connected to the serial port after 10minutes of inactivity.


Server Status and Control Commands

The following RSC commands show server status or control server operation:

    • environment (or showenvironment)

 

    • shownetwork

 

    • console

 

    • break

 

    • xir

 

    • bootmode

 

    • reset

 

    • poweroff

 

    • poweron

 

    • setlocator

 

    • showlocator

 

environment

Use the environment command to display a snapshot of server environmental status, such as temperatures, power supply status, front panel LED status, keyswitch position, and so forth. You can also use the command abbreviation env. The display uses similar format to that used for the UNIX command prtdiag(1m).

For example:

rsc> environment
=============== Environmental Status ===============
System Temperatures (Celsius):
------------------------------
      CPU0    60
      CPU1    57
       RSC    30
=================================
RSC Power Status:
-----------------
RSC is running on Normal System Power
RSC Battery Voltage: 4.18V
=================================
Front Status Panel:
-------------------
Keyswitch position is in On mode.
=================================
System LED Status: GENERAL ERROR    POWER
                      [OFF]         [ ON]
Disk LED Status:    OK = GREEN  ERROR = YELLOW
        DISK  1:    [OK]
        DISK  0:    [OK]
=================================
Fan Bank:
---------
Bank      Speed     Status
         (0-255)
----      -----     ------
 SYS       151        OK
=================================
Power Supplies:
---------------
Supply     Status
------     ------
  1          OK: 560w
=================================
rsc>

The display differs according to the server model and configuration. Note that some environmental information may be unavailable when the server is in Standby mode.

showenvironment

 

The shownenvironmentcommand is the same as the environmentcommand. (Not available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers.)

shownetwork

The shownetwork command displays the current network configuration.
For example:

rsc> shownetwork
RSC network configuration is:
DHCP server: 129.149.2.3
IP Address: 129.149.2.6
Gateway Address: 129.149.2.7, 129.149.2.8
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Ethernet Address: ae:30:30:00:00:01
rsc>

console

Use the console command to enter RSC console mode and connect to the server console from the RSC shell. When you use this command, the system displays a standard Solaris login prompt. If RSC is not designated as the server console, nothing is displayed.

You must have C level user permission to use this command. An escape character sequence is used to return to the RSC prompt. The default escape sequence is ~. (tilde period). See escape_char.

break

Use the break command to put the server into Debug mode. You must have C level user permission to use this command. The server front panel keyswitch must not be in the Lock position, and RSC must be designated as the console (see Chapter 6). Debug mode can use either kadb or OpenBoot PROM, depending on server configuration.

xir

This command generates the equivalent of an externally initiated reset (XIR) of the server. You must have R level user permission to use this command. The server enters OpenBoot PROM mode and displays the ok prompt. This command is useful for driver or kernel debugging, as most of the contents of the server’s memory and registers is preserved. To resume operation of the system after using the xir command, you must reboot the server.

bootmode [-u] [normal|forth|reset_nvram|diag|
skip_diag]

This command provides control over the server firmware behavior after a server reset. Functionality of this command is identical to that available on non-USB Sun keyboards using L1 key combinations. You must have R level user permission to use this command. If you use the bootmode command without arguments, RSC displays the current boot mode.

The bootmode setting overrides the server’s OpenBoot Diagnostics diag-switch? setting immediately after the next reset only. If RSC does not detect a server reset within 10 minutes, the bootmode command is ignored. For example:

rsc> bootmode forth
rsc> reset

To set the diag or skip_diag option, you must follow the bootmode command with the poweroff and poweron commands within 10 minutes. For example:

rsc> bootmode skip_diag
rsc> poweroff
rsc> poweron

To force console input and output to RSC, use the -u option before specifying the boot mode. This is the equivalent of using the OpenBoot PROM commands shown in Redirecting the Console to RSC, but affects the next boot only.

The following table describes modes you can specify using the bootmode command.

 

TABLE 4-2 Modes Used With the bootmode Command
Mode Description
-u Force the server to direct the console to RSC; the -u option must precede any boot mode you specify; requires server reset
normal Normal boot; server runs low-level diagnostics; requires server reset
forth Enter Forth interpreter as soon as possible (equivalent to L1-F on non-USB keyboards); requires server reset
reset_nvram Reset all NVRAM variables to default values (equivalent to L1-N on non-USB keyboards); requires server reset
diag Force the server to run full diagnostics (equivalent to L1-D on non-USB keyboards); requires server power-off and power-on
skip_diag Force the server to skip diagnostics (equivalent to L1-S on non-USB keyboards); requires server power-off and power-on

Note – The diag and skip_diag modes take effect only if you follow the bootmode command with the poweroff and poweron commands within 10 minutes.

 

reset

This command forcibly resets the server immediately. You must have R level user permission to use this command. The server reboots according to the server’s designated boot mode. The reset command does not perform a clean shutdown of the system, and data may be lost. When possible, use the corresponding Solaris administration command instead.

 


Note – The default configuration of Sun workgroup server firmware does not invoke POST when the server resets. However, you can change this behavior through NVRAM variable settings; for additional details, see the Platform Notes for your server.

 

poweroff

Use the poweroff command to power off the server. You must have R level user permission to use this command. This command has no effect if the server is already powered off. RSC remains available since it uses the server’s standby power. Note, however, that some environmental information may be unavailable when the server is in Standby mode.

The poweroff command attempts to perform a clean shutdown of the system. However, when possible, use the corresponding Solaris administration command instead.

It can take up to 35 seconds for the poweroff command to completely shut down the system (except on Sun Enterprise 250 servers). This is because RSC waits for a clean shutdown to complete before poweroff can occur.

 


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the poweroffcommand does not perform a clean shutdown of the system.

poweron

Use the poweron command to power on the server. You must have R level user permission to use this command. This command has no effect if the server’s keyswitch is in the Standby position, or the server is already powered on.

setlocator

Use the setlocator command to turn the system locator LED on or off. This command applies to Sun Fire V480 servers only. For more information on this command, refer to Controlling the Locator LED.

For more information on the locator LED, refer to the Sun Fire V480 Administrator’s Guide.

showlocator

Use the showlocator command to view the state of the system locator LED (on or off). This command applies to Sun Fire V480 servers only. For more information on this command, refer to Controlling the Locator LED.

For more information on the locator LED, refer to the Sun Fire V480 Administrator’s Guide.


RSC View Log Commands

Use the following RSC commands to work with RSC and console log files:

    • loghistory (or lhist)

 

    • consolehistory (or chist)

 

    • consolerestart

 

loghistory [index [+|-]n] [pause n]

Use the loghistory command without subcommands to display the history of all events logged in the RSC event buffer. These events include server reset events and all RSC commands that change the state of the system. You can also use the command abbreviation lhist.

Use the following subcommands to control loghistory display.

index [+|-]n

Use the index subcommand to designate a buffer position at which to begin the display, as follows:

    • index +n to designate a line number relative to the beginning of the buffer

 

    • index -n to designate a line number relative to the end of the buffer

 

    • index n to designate a line number relative to the beginning of the buffer (same as index +n)

 

The origin of counting is 1; that is, index +1 indicates the first line in the buffer, index -1 indicates the last. For example:

rsc> loghistory index -30

This command prints the last 30 lines and any additional lines that were appended to the buffer between the time that the command began execution and the time that it terminated.

pause n

Use the pause subcommand to display n lines of the log at a time (similar to the more command). The value of n must be a decimal integer. The default is to display the entire RSC log without pausing.

Each event recorded in the log has the following format:

$TIME $HOSTNAME $EVENTID $message

EVENTID is a unique identifier for the event, TIME is the time the event occurred (as measured by RSC time), and message is a user-friendly description of the event.

The following is an example event log entry:

FRI JAN 01 07:33:03 2001 sst4828: 00060003: "RSC System reset"

consolehistory [boot|run|oboot|orun]
[index [+|-]
n] [pause n]

Use the consolehistory command to display console messages logged in RSC buffers. With no arguments, this command prints the entire contents of all non-empty console buffers. You can use the command abbreviation chist.

There are four console logs:

    • The boot buffer contains POST, OpenBoot PROM, and UNIX boot messages received from the server for the most recent boot.

 

    • The run buffer contains the most recent data received from the server operating system.

 

    • The oboot buffer contains POST, OpenBoot PROM, and UNIX boot messages for the first power-on boot, the original boot.

 

    • The orun buffer contains the data received from the server’s operating system after the first reboot that follows a power-on boot (the original boot).

 

 

Each buffer can contain up to 64Kbytes of information. (On Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the original boot log and boot log buffers can contain up to 16 Kbytes of information.)

When the first power-on boot begins, RSC fills the original boot (oboot) buffer with data from the server’s console. After that buffer fills up, it writes data to the original run (orun) log. When the orun log fills up, it overwrites old data in the orun log.

When RSC senses a server reset while writing the orun log, it switches to the boot log. After that fills up, it switches to the run log. When the run log fills up, it overwrites old data in the run log.

When RSC senses a server reset while writing the current run log, it switches to the current boot log again.

pause n

Use the pause subcommand to display n lines of the log at a time (similar to the more command). The value of n must be a decimal integer. The default is to display 10 lines of the log at a time.

See loghistory [index [+|-]n] [pause n] for a description of the index subcommand.

 


Note – Time stamps recorded in console logs reflect server time. These time stamps may be offset from RSC time stamps recorded in the RSC event log. To synchronize RSC time with server time, use the rscadm command rscadm date -s, reset the server, or run the script /usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/rsc-initscript. You can obtain the string to use for platform-name using the Solaris command
uname -i.

 

consolerestart

Use the consolerestart command to make the current boot and run logs the original logs (designated oboot and orun). This command copies the current boot and run buffers to the oboot and orun buffers, overwriting the previous contents. Next, it clears the current boot and run buffers, and begins logging to the old run log. You must have A level user permission to use this command.

For example, after adding a hardware component to the server, reboot the server and use the consolerestart command so that the new component will appear in the original console logs.


RSC Configuration Commands

Use the following RSC commands to set or show characteristics of the RSC or server configuration:

    • set

 

    • show

 

    • date (also showdate and setdate)

 

    • password

 

    • useradd

 

    • userdel

 

    • usershow

 

    • userpassword

 

    • userperm

 

    • resetrsc

 

set variable value

Use the set command to set an RSC configuration variable. You must have A level user permission to use this command. See RSC Configuration Variables for descriptions of these variables.

Changes to some variables do not take effect until the you reset RSC using the command-line interface (CLI) resetrsc command, or the rscadm subcommand rscadm resetrsc, or by using the graphical user interface.

You can use the null string («») to set a variable to null. To set a variable to a string that includes spaces, enclose the string in double quotes. For example:

rsc> set page_info2 ""
rsc> set page_init1 "&F &E0"

show [variable]

Use the show command to display the value of RSC configuration variables. You can specify one variable only; if you do not specify a variable, RSC displays all configuration variables. See RSC Configuration Variables for descriptions of these variables.

date [[mmdd]HHMM|mmddHHMM[cc]yy][.SS]

Use the date command without arguments to show RSC’s current date and time. If you have A level user permission, you can use the date command to set the current date and time. The following table describes components of the date format.

 

TABLE 4-3 Components of the date Command
Option Description
mm Month number
dd Day-of-the-month number
HH Hour number (24-hour system)
MM Minute number
.SS Second number
cc First two digits of year
yy Last two digits of year

 

You may omit the month, day, and year; the current values are applied as defaults.

Examples:

rsc> date 091521452000
Fri Sep 15 21:45:00 EDT 2000
rsc> date 09152145
Fri Sep 15 21:45:00 EDT 2000
rsc> date 2145
Fri Sep 15 21:45:00 EDT 2000

The first example sets the time to September 15, 9:45 p.m., 2000. The second example sets the time to September 15, 9:45 p.m. of the current year. The third example sets the time to 9:45 p.m. of the current month, day, and year.

 


Note – Whenever the server boots, it sets the RSC current date and time. In addition, the RSC hardware includes a battery backed-up time-of-day chip for maintaining RSC time in between server reboots. However, to keep RSC time in sync with server time, you should periodically run the script /usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/rsc-initscript. You can obtain the string to use for platform-name using the Solaris command uname -i. If you like, you can run this script at a specified interval using the cron utility. You can also use the rscadm command rscadm date -s.

 

showdate

 

Same as the datecommand without arguments. (Not available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers.)

setdate

 

Same as the datecommand with arguments. You need to have Alevel user permission to use the setdatecommand to set the RSC current date and time.
(Not available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers.)

password

Use the password command to change the RSC password for the account to which you are logged in. This command behaves similarly to the UNIX passwd(1) command.

When used to change a password, RSC prompts for your current password, and if you enter it correctly, it prompts for the new password. RSC prompts again for the new password and updates it if entered identically both times. For example:

rsc> password
password: Changing password for username
Enter login password: ******
Enter new password: ******
Re-enter new password: ******
rsc>

Passwords have the following restrictions:

    • They must contain at least six characters (only the first eight characters are significant).

 

    • They must contain at least two alphabetic characters and at least one numeric or special character; alphabetic characters can be both uppercase and lowercase.

 

    • They must differ from the user’s login name and any reverse or circular shift of that login name; for comparison purposes, uppercase and lowercase letters are equivalent.

 

    • The new password must differ from the old by at least three characters; for comparison purposes, uppercase and lowercase letters are equivalent.

 

useradd username

 

Use the useraddusernamecommand to add an RSC user account. You must have Ulevel user permission to use this command. The maximum number of RSC user accounts is 16, except on Sun Enterprise 250 servers, where the maximum number is 4. Valid characters for usernameinclude:

    • Alphabetic characters

 

    • Numeric characters

 

    • Period (.)

 

    • Underscore (_)

 

    • Hyphen (-)

 

 

The usernamefield has a maximum length of 16 characters (eight characters for Sun Enterprise 250 servers), must contain at least one lowercase alphabetic character, and the first character must be alphabetic. If these restrictions are not met, the system issues a warning and the command fails.

userdel username

This command deletes an RSC user account. You must have U level user permission to use this command.

usershow [username]

 

This command shows RSC user accounts; a maximum of 16 user accounts are available (4 on the Sun Enterprise 250 servers). You must have Ulevel user permission to use this command. If no argument is supplied, all accounts are shown. Information displayed includes username, permissions, and whether a password is assigned. For example:

rsc> usershow
Username Permissions Password?
setup    cuar        Assigned
msmith   c--r        None
rsc>

userpassword username

This command sets or changes the password for the specified user account. You must have U level user permission to use this command. RSC does not prompt for an existing password. See the password command for details on password format and restrictions. For example:

rsc> userpassword msmith
New password:
Re-enter new password:
rsc>

userperm username [a][u][c][r]

This command sets or changes permission levels for a specified user account.

All RSC users can look at RSC information. The following arguments increase a user’s authorization level:

    • a – Administration permission; authorized to change the state of RSC configuration variables

 

    • u – User administration permission; authorized to use commands that add and delete users, change user permissions, and change the authorization level of other users

 

    • c – Console permission; authorized to connect to the server console

 

    • r – Reset/power permission; authorized to reset, power on, and power off the server, and reboot RSC

 

You must have U level user permission to use this command. You can specify zero through four authorizations. The default authorization level for a new RSC account is none of the above (that is, read-only).

If you do not specify authorization levels, RSC sets the permissions for username to read-only. However, the default user permission for the account you create during the installation procedure is cuar (full authorization).

A user with read-only permission can only use the following commands:

    • help

 

    • password

 

    • date(without arguments) and showdate(The showdatecommand is not available on Sun Enterprise 250 servers.)

 

    • shownetwork

 

    • environmentand showenvironment(The showenvironmentcommand is not available on Sun Enterprise 250 servers.)

 

    • loghistory

 

    • consolehistory

 

    • show

 

    • versionand showsc(The showsccommand is not available on Sun Enterprise 250 servers.)

 

    • logout

 

    • showlocator (Sun Fire V480 servers only)

 

resetrsc

The resetrsc command performs a hard reset of RSC. This terminates all current RSC sessions. You must have A level user permission to use this command. You can also reset RSC by using the rscadm resetrsc command.


Note – When you reset RSC on a Sun Enterprise 250 server without also resetting the server, RSC time defaults to 1/1/70. To synchronize RSC time with server time, reset the server, use the rscadmcommand rscadm date -sor run the script /usr/platform/platform-name/rsc/rsc-initscript. You can obtain the string to use for platform-nameusing the Solaris command uname -i.


Other RSC Commands

help

The help command displays a list of all RSC shell commands and a brief description of each.

version [-v]

The version command displays the firmware version running on RSC. Use the -v option to display more verbose information. For example:

rsc> version
RSC Version: 2.2
RSC Bootmon version: 2.0.0
RSC Firmware version: 2.2.0
rsc> version -v
RSC Version: 2.2
RSC Bootmon version: 2.0.0
RSC bootmon checksum: 4D018EBD
RSC Firmware version: 2.2.0
RSC Build Release: 20
RSC firmware checksum: 595254B1
RSC firmware built Aug 13 2001, 14:45:17
RSC System Memory Size: 8 MB
RSC NVRAM Version = 4
RSC hardware type: 3
rsc>

showsc

Same as the versioncommand without the -voption. (Not available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers.)

logout

The logout command ends your RSC session and closes your RSC connection.

flashupdate ip_address image

The flashupdate command updates the RSC Flash ROM image at the IP address you specify, with the image you specify.

showfru

The showfru command displays information stored in the RSC serial EEPROM.


RSC Configuration Variables

RSC has non-volatile configuration variables you can use to change RSC behavior. The installer sets most configuration variables following installation. Thereafter, you can use the GUI, RSC shell, or the rscadm set command to set or change configuration variables.

You must have A level user permission to set configuration variables from the GUI or RSC shell; you must log in to the server as root to use the rscadm utility.

Use the show command to show configuration variables, and use the set command to set a variable. Changes to variables take effect immediately except as noted.

You can use the null string («») to set a variable to null. To set a variable to a string that includes spaces, enclose the string in double quotes. Note that it is not necessary to enter the null string or use quotes in GUI entry fields.

Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) Variables

ppp_local_ip_addr

Use this variable to specify the Internet Protocol (IP) address for RSC to use during a PPP session; use standard dot notation. If this variable is empty, RSC expects the remote node to set the Internet address dynamically. The default setting is 0.0.0.0 (empty). Changes to this variable take effect on the next PPP connection over the RSC modem.

ppp_remote_ip_addr

Use this variable to specify the IP address for the remote node during a PPP session; use standard dot notation. If this variable is empty, RSC expects that the remote node already has an Internet address assigned for the PPP session. The default setting is 0.0.0.0 (empty). Changes to this variable take effect on the next PPP connection over the RSC modem.

ppp_enabled

Use this variable to specify whether PPP is the default protocol on the RSC modem. Valid values are true or false; the default is false. Changes to this variable take effect on the next login connection over the RSC modem.

Modem Variables


Note – Modem variables are not available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers. Instead, you connect an external modem to the RSC serial port and use serial port variables to configure the connection. Refer to Serial Connectionsfor more information.

modem_parity

This variable sets the RSC modem parity for incoming connections. Valid values are none, odd, or even. The default setting is none. Changes to this variable take effect on the next login connection over the RSC modem.

modem_stop

This variable sets the number of RSC stop bits for incoming connections. Valid values are 1 or 2. The default setting is 1. Changes to this variable take effect on the next login connection over the RSC modem.

modem_data

This variable sets the number of RSC modem data bits for incoming connections. Valid values are 7 and 8. The default setting is 8. Changes to this variable take effect on the next login connection over the RSC modem.

country_code

This variable sets the modem country code. The default setting is 001 (USA). Changes to this variable take effect on the next login connection over the RSC modem.

Valid values are listed alphabetically by country in the following table:

719 Abu Dhabi 093 Afghanistan 737 Ajman
355 Albania 213 Algeria 376 Andorra
244 Angola 815 Anguilla 722 Antarctica
801 Antigua/Barbuda 054 Argentina 374 Armenia
297 Aruba 247 Ascension 061 Australia
043 Austria 994 Azerbaijan 707 Azores
802 Bahamas 973 Bahrain 708 Balearic Isle
723 Bali 880 Bangladesh 803 Barbados
375 Belarus 032 Belgium 501 Belize
229 Benin 441 Bermuda 975 Bhutan
591 Bolivia 724 Borneo 387 Bosnia
267 Botswana 55 Brazil 673 Brunei
359 Bulgaria 226 Burkina Faso 725 Burma
257 Burundi 855 Cambodia 237 Cameroon
002 Canada 720 Canary Isles 238 Cape Verde
805 Cayman Isles 236 Central African Republic 235 Chad
709 Channel Isles 726 Chatham 056 Chile
086 China 672 Christmas Island
669 Cocos Island 057 Colombia 718 Comoros Isles
242 Congo 682 Cook Isle 506 Costa Rica
385 Croatia 053 Cuba 700 Curacao
357 Cyprus 042 Czech Republic 045 Denmark
727 Diego Garcia 253 Djibouti 806 Dominica
816 Dominican Republic 704 Easter Isles 593 Ecuador
020 Egypt 503 El Salvador
240 Equatorial Guinea 291 Eritrea 372 Estonia
251 Ethiopia 555 Europe 554 Europe A
500 Falkland Islands 298 Faroe Islands 679 Fiji
358 Finland 033 France 594 French Guiana
693 French Polynesia 241 Gabon 220 Gambia
007 Georgia 049 Germany 233 Ghana
350 Gibraltar 030 Greece 299 Greenland
807 Grenada 705 Grenadines 590 Guadaloupe
671 Guam 502 Guatemala 224 Guinea
245 Guinea-Bissau 592 Guyana 509 Haiti
388 Herzegovina 504 Honduras 728 Hong Kong
036 Hungary 354 Iceland 091 India
062 Indonesia 098 Iran 964 Iraq
353 Ireland 711 Isle of Man 972 Israel
039 Italy 225 Ivory Coast 808 Jamaica
081 Japan 962 Jordan 729 Kampuchea
008 Kazakhstan 254 Kenya 686 Kiribati
956 Kuwait 996 Kyrgyzstan 856 Laos
371 Latvia 961 Lebanon 738 Leeward Isles
266 Lesotho 231 Liberia 218 Libya
013 Liechtenstein 370 Lithuania 352 Luxembourg
853 Macau 389 Macedonia 261 Madagascar
721 Madeira 265 Malawi 060 Malaysia
960 Maldives 223 Mali 356 Malta
230 Mauritius 692 Marshall Isle 596 Martinique
222 Mauritania 269 Mayotte 052 Mexico
691 Micronesia 701 Midway Isles 959 Moldova
976 Mongolia 377 Monaco 716 Montenegro
817 Montserrat 820 Morocco 258 Mozambique
095 Myanmar/Burma 264 Namibia 730 Nauru
977 Nepal 689 Netherland Antilles 031 Netherlands
702 Nevis 687 New Caledonia 731 New Hebrides
064 New Zealand 505 Nicaragua 227 Niger
234 Nigeria 683 Niue 670 Norfolk Isles
850 North Korea 349 Northern Ireland 047 Norway
732 Okinawa 968 Oman 092 Pakistan
680 Palau 507 Panama 675 Papua Guinea
595 Paraguay 051 Peru 063 Philippines
004 Pitcairn 048 Poland 351 Portugal
819 Puerto Rico 974 Qatar 262 Reunion
040 Romania 009 Russia 250 Rwanda
290 Saint Helena 809 Saint Kitts/Nevi 810 Saint Lucia
706 Saint Martin 508 Saint Pierre/Miq 811 Saint Vincent
733 Saipan 684 Samoa 378 San Marino
239 Sao Tome 966 Saudi Arabia 221 Senegal
717 Serbia 248 Seychelles 232 Sierra Leone
065 Singapore 014 Slovak Republic 015 Slovakia
386 Slovenia 677 Solomon Isles 252 Somalia
027 South Africa 082 South Korea 034 Spain
094 Sri Lanka 249 Sudan 597 Suriname
268 Swaziland 046 Sweden 041 Switzerland
963 Syria 734 Tahiti 886 Taiwan
010 Tajikistan 255 Tanzania 066 Thailand
735 Tibet 228 Togo 676 Tonga
812 Trinidad/Toba 216 Tunisia 090 Turkey
011 Turkmenistan 813 Turks/Caicos 688 Tuvalu
256 Uganda 380 Ukraine 971 United Arab Emirates
044 United Kingdom 001 United States of America 598 Uruguay
012 Uzbekistan 678 Vanuatu 713 Vatican City
058 Venezuela 814 Virgin Isle 084 Vietnam
736 Wake Islands 681 Wallis/Futuna 967 Yemen
381 Yugoslavia 243 Zaire 260 Zambia
263 Zimbabwe

Alert Variables

page_enabled

Use this variable to specify whether paging is enabled for RSC alerts. Valid values are true or false. The default is false.

mail_enabled

Use this variable to specify whether an email message is enabled for RSC alerts. Valid values are true or false. The default is false.

page_info1

This variable contains the phone number and associated pager ID number for sending a Telocator Alphanumeric Protocol (TAP) alert to a pager. Use the character @ to separate the telephone number and PIN ID number (if used or needed). Valid characters are:

    • digits (0-9)

 

    • * (asterisk)

 

    • # (pound sign)

 

    • , (comma, for pause dialing)

 

    • @ (for appending PIN)

 

If both the page_info1 and page_info2 variables are empty, or if the page_enabled variable is set to false, no paging will occur. The default
setting for page_info1 is empty. For example:

rsc> set page_info1 9,,[email protected]

page_init1

This variable specifies a string consisting of attention (AT) commands used for configuring the RSC modem prior to sending an alert to pager 1.

page_password1

This variable contains the pager service password used to send an alert to pager 1. The password must be an alphanumeric string of six characters or fewer.

page_baud1

This variable specifies the modem baud rate to use when sending an alert to pager 1. Valid values are 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, and 9600. After RSC sends the page alert, the baud setting reverts to 9600 baud.


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the baud setting reverts to the setting specified for the serial_baudvariable.

page_data1

This variable specifies the number of RSC modem data bits for sending an alert to pager 1. Valid values are 7 and 8. After RSC sends the page alert, the data bits revert to the setting specified in the modem_data variable.


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the data bits revert to the setting specified for the serial_datavariable.

page_parity1

This variable specifies the RSC modem parity for sending an alert to pager 1. Valid values are none, odd, and even. After RSC sends the page alert, the parity reverts to the setting specified in the modem_parity variable.


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the parity reverts to the setting specified for the serial_parityvariable.

page_stop1

This variable specifies the number of RSC modem stop bits for sending an alert to pager 1. Valid values are 1 and 2. After RSC sends the page alert, the stop bits revert to the setting specified in the modem_stop variable.


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the stop bits revert to the setting specified for the serial_stopvariable.

page_info2

This variable contains the phone number and associated pager ID number for sending a Telocator Alphanumeric Protocol (TAP) alert to another pager. Use the character @ to separate the telephone number and ID. Valid characters are:

    • digits (0-9)

 

    • * (asterisk)

 

    • # (pound sign)

 

    • , (comma, for pause dialing)

 

    • @ (for appending PIN)

 

If both the page_info1 and page_info2 variables are empty, or if the page_enabled variable is set to false, no paging will occur. The default
setting for page_info2 is empty. For example:

rsc> set page_info2 [email protected]

page_init2

This variable specifies a string consisting of attention (AT) commands used for configuring the RSC modem prior to sending an alert to pager 2.

page_password2

This variable contains the pager service password used to send an alert to pager 2. The password must be an alphanumeric string of six characters or fewer.

page_baud2

This variable specifies the modem baud rate to use when sending an alert to pager 2. Valid values are 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, and 9600. After RSC sends the page alert, the baud setting reverts to 9600 baud.


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the baud setting reverts to the setting specified for the serial_baudvariable.

page_data2

This variable specifies the number of RSC modem data bits for sending an alert to pager 2. Valid values are 7 and 8. After RSC sends the page alert, the data bits revert to the setting specified in the modem_data variable.


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the data bits revert to the setting specified for the serial_datavariable.

page_parity2

This variable specifies the RSC modem parity for sending an alert to pager 2. Valid values are none, odd, and even. After RSC sends the page alert, the parity reverts to the setting specified in the modem_parity variable.


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the parity reverts to the setting specified for the serial_parityvariable.

page_stop2

This variable specifies the number of RSC modem stop bits for sending an alert to pager 2. Valid values are 1 and 2. After RSC sends the page alert, the stop bits revert to the setting specified in the modem_stop variable.


Note – For Sun Enterprise 250 servers, the stop bits revert to the setting specified for the serial_stopvariable.

customerinfo

This variable contains customer information used in the message generated for a pager or email alert, for instance, one of the following:

    • Server service contract number (recommended)

 

    • Server location

 

    • Name or telephone extension of the server’s system administrator

 

    • Name of the department that owns the server

This string can be up to 40 characters (eight characters on Sun Enterprise 250 servers), including alphanumeric characters and hyphen (-). The default setting is empty.

hostname

This variable contains the name of the server connected directly to RSC. RSC includes this host name in alert messages. This string can be up to 40 characters (eight characters on Sun Enterprise 250 servers), including alphanumeric characters and hyphen (-). The default setting is empty.

mailuser

This variable contains the address used for email alerts. The string has a 40-character limit; the default setting is empty. Although only a single mail address is permitted, you can notify several people that a problem has occurred by using an email alias.

mailhost

This variable contains a colon-separated list of Internet addresses to which RSC sends Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) mail alerts. Each address is tried until the SMTP alert is successfully transmitted. Specify addresses using standard dot notation. For example:

rsc> set mailhost 139.143.4.2:139.142.4.15

You can specify a maximum of two addresses, separated by a colon. If this variable is empty, or if the mail_enabled variable is set to false, no email is sent. The default setting is empty.

page_verbose

This variable sets the maximum length for alert messages sent to pagers. The default setting, false, limits pager alert messages to 78 characters. The setting true allows the use of long alert messages, which may contain 300 characters or more. Note that some pagers or paging services may not allow long messages, and that in such cases some alert message may not be sent to pagers.


Note – The page_verbosevariable is not available for Sun Enterprise 250 servers. Alert messages sent to pagers have unrestricted length.

Ethernet Port Variables

ip_mode

Use this variable to control how RSC configures the IP address for its local Ethernet port. Choose the ip_mode value according to the services available on the network to which RSC is connected. The following list describes the available values.

    • none – Ethernet port is disabled and is not accessible.

 

    • dhcp – Use the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to obtain the IP address.

 

    • config – Use the ip_addr configuration variable to obtain the IP address.

 

The default setting is dhcp. Changes to this variable take effect after the next RSC reset.

ip_addr

This variable is only used if the ip_mode variable is set to config. Specify the IP address in standard Internet dot notation. The default setting is 0.0.0.0 (empty). Changes to this variable take effect after the next RSC reset.

ip_netmask

This variable is only used if the ip_mode variable is set to config. Specify the subnet mask in standard Internet dot notation. The default setting is 0.0.0.0 (empty). Changes to this variable take effect after the next RSC reset.

ip_gateway

This variable is only used if the ip_mode variable is set to config. This is the default gateway to which RSC will send IP packets when the destination is not on the same subnet as RSC. Specify the IP address in standard Internet dot notation. The default setting is 0.0.0.0 (empty). Changes to this variable take effect after the next RSC reset.

tpe_link_test

This variable enables 10BASE-T Ethernet link integrity tests when set to true, the default. If you are using RSC in a hub that does not support Ethernet link integrity tests or that has them disabled, set this variable to false. Changes to this variable take effect after the next RSC reset. The tpe_link_test variable behaves similarly to the OpenBoot PROM environment variable named «tpe-link-test?», which is available on some SPARC platforms.

RSC and the local hub should have Ethernet link integrity tests enabled or disabled consistently. If this setting is not consistent, communication may not be possible.

Console Session Variable

escape_char

This variable sets the escape sequence character for ending a console session or modem setup and returning to the RSC shell. The escape sequence applies to all RSC users for the server. The escape sequence consists of the escape character followed by a period. The default escape character is ~ (tilde).

The escape sequence character can be a single alphanumeric character. It can also be a control character. To enter a control character as the escape character, type «^» (Shift-6) to represent the Control key, followed by another character. If the second character is a question mark (?), the Delete key is selected; otherwise the second character is converted to a control character and used as the escape character. For example, if you enter ^y to set the escape character, users will use Control-y period to end a console session.


RSC Shell Error Messages

This section provides additional information about error messages received at the rsc> prompt.

Usage Errors

This section lists usage error messages that are displayed due to improper command syntax. Refer to the description of the command in this chapter for the correct syntax.

Invalid command. Type 'help' for list of commands.
Usage: bootmode [-u] [normal|forth|reset_nvram|diag|skip_diag]
Usage: break
Usage: consolehistory [boot|run|oboot|orun] [index [+|-]<n>][pause <n>]
Usage: consolerestart
Usage: setlocator [on | off]
Usage: date [[mmdd]HHMM | mmddHHMM[cc]yy][.SS]
Usage: environment
Usage: loghistory [index [+|-]<n>] [pause <n>]
Usage: password
Usage: poweroff
Usage: poweron
Usage: reset
Usage: resetrsc
Usage: set <variable> <value>
Usage: setdate [[mmdd]HHMM | mmddHHMM[cc]yy][.SS]
Usage: show [variable]
Usage: showdate
Usage: showenvironment
Usage: shownetwork
Usage: showsc
Usage: useradd <username>
Usage: userdel <username>
Usage: userpassword <username>
Usage: userperm <username> [c][u][a][r]
Usage: version [-v]
Usage: xir

General Errors

RSC reports the following general errors.

Could not get username for user <username>

During execution of the userpassword command, a SEEPROM error occurred.

Error adding user <username>

An error occurred during execution of the useradd command. This message is followed by a more detailed message.

Error changing password for <username>

An error occurred during execution of the userpassword command. This message is followed by a more detailed message.

Error changing password for <username>

During execution of the userpassword command, a SEEPROM error occurred.

Error changing password for <username> - password must be at least three characters different from old password - password must not be based on username

You entered an invalid password.

Error deleting user <username>

An error occurred during execution of the userdel command. This message is followed by a more detailed message.

Error displaying user <username>

An error occurred during execution of the usershow command. This message is followed by a more detailed message.

Error setting permission for <username>

An error occurred during execution of the userperm command. This message is followed by a more detailed message.

ERROR: username did not start with letter or did not contain lowercase letter

You entered an invalid username.

Failed to allocate buffer for console mode

During execution of the console command, RSC could not allocate enough memory to connect to the console.

Failed to allocate memory!

During execution of the show command, RSC could not allocate enough memory to show the variable’s value.

Failed to get password for <username>

During execution of the userpassword command, a SEEPROM error occurred.

Failed to set <variable> to <value>

During execution of the set command, RSC encountered a SEEPROM error.

Invalid login

Login attempt failed. This message appears at the login prompt.

Invalid password

You entered an illegal password with the userpassword command.

Invalid permission: <permission>

You entered an invalid user permission. Valid permissions are [c] [u] [a] [r]. See userperm username [a][u][c][r].

Malformed username

You specified a nonexistent user when entering the userpassword, userperm, or userdel command.

No free user slots

This error occurs if you try to add a user account when RSC already has four accounts configured. RSC supports only four user accounts. You must delete an account before you can add another.

Passwords don't match

The two entries for a new password did not match.

Permission denied

You attempted to execute a shell command for which you do not have the proper user permission level.

Sorry, wrong password

You entered an incorrect current password.

Unable to get value of variable <variable>

During execution of the show command, you used an invalid variable name.

User already registered

The user you are trying to add already has an RSC account on this server.

User does not exist

The username you specified is not associated with an RSC account on this server.

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